homedesigning:

Amazing Natural Home

http://kateoplis.tumblr.com/post/77740677543/ive-lived-in-new-york-since-1979-it-was-a-place

kateoplis:

I’ve lived in New York since 1979. It was a place that they gave you your anonymity. And not just if you were famous. New Yorkers nodded at you. New Yorkers smiled at you at the Shakespeare & Co. bookshop. New Yorkers would make a terse comment to you. “Big fan,” they’d say. “Loved you in

kateoplis:

“The most shocking part of Generation Like, PBS’s new Frontline documentary about youth media culture, occurs when a bunch of teenagers confess they don’t know what the term ‘sell-out’ means. This term, so vital to the identities of at least three generations that had come before them, didn’t register as something negative. In fact, it didn’t register at all. If you hear a loud crunching noise at around 10pm tonight, don’t worry. It’s just a bunch of old people wringing their hands in unison.” 
"We’re all brands now, and this is meant to be terrifying. And it probably is. But the entire documentary is also liberally soaked with a kind of romanticization of the past; a struggle to understand how America could’ve produced such a nauseatingly earnest generation of tech-savvy sell-outs. Boomers, Gen Xers and even older Millennials are meant to be shouting, HAVE YOU NO SHAME, at their screens — without recognizing that perhaps the answer is both ‘no’ and ‘shame about what?’"
“It’s that matter-of-fact attitude that’s so foreign to many of us over the age of 25 who are watching at home. ‘Selling out’ has simply become ‘paying the bills.’ It almost feels like they’re cheating. Who do these young punks think they are to just skip that step where you wallow in a pit of self-deception, rationalization, and guilt?”
“Sure, everything is the worst. But it always has been. There’s almost something refreshing about the way that many of these kids approach the seemingly insidious aspects of 21st century marketing. They seem less racked with guilt over the shitty realities of the world. They aren’t bothering to shout LET’S GET THIS DYSTOPIA STARTED, like I did at the screen. Because they don’t even see it as a dystopia. But as always, only time will tell if they’re right.”
Generation Like
Photo: Time

kateoplis:

The most shocking part of Generation Like, PBS’s new Frontline documentary about youth media culture, occurs when a bunch of teenagers confess they don’t know what the term ‘sell-out’ means. This term, so vital to the identities of at least three generations that had come before them, didn’t register as something negative. In fact, it didn’t register at all. If you hear a loud crunching noise at around 10pm tonight, don’t worry. It’s just a bunch of old people wringing their hands in unison.”

"We’re all brands now, and this is meant to be terrifying. And it probably is. But the entire documentary is also liberally soaked with a kind of romanticization of the past; a struggle to understand how America could’ve produced such a nauseatingly earnest generation of tech-savvy sell-outs. Boomers, Gen Xers and even older Millennials are meant to be shouting, HAVE YOU NO SHAME, at their screens — without recognizing that perhaps the answer is both ‘no’ and ‘shame about what?’"

It’s that matter-of-fact attitude that’s so foreign to many of us over the age of 25 who are watching at home. ‘Selling out’ has simply become ‘paying the bills.’ It almost feels like they’re cheating. Who do these young punks think they are to just skip that step where you wallow in a pit of self-deception, rationalization, and guilt?”

Sure, everything is the worst. But it always has been. There’s almost something refreshing about the way that many of these kids approach the seemingly insidious aspects of 21st century marketing. They seem less racked with guilt over the shitty realities of the world. They aren’t bothering to shout LET’S GET THIS DYSTOPIA STARTED, like I did at the screen. Because they don’t even see it as a dystopia. But as always, only time will tell if they’re right.”

Generation Like

Photo: Time

kateoplis:

jtotheizzoe
newsweek:

(via Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index 2013)

Are you in a happy state? Is your state more unhappy? Gallup made a chart to help you find out…  :) (New York, where we are, is 35, falling five down the list in the past year…

great infograph

newsweek:

(via Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index 2013)

Are you in a happy state? Is your state more unhappy? Gallup made a chart to help you find out… :) (New York, where we are, is 35, falling five down the list in the past year…

great infograph

kateoplis:

“Speaking to Jim Jarmusch, it turns out, isn’t so different from watching one of his films. His work, like his conversation, doesn’t cohere into stories so much as constellations, networks of seemingly isolated ideas which achieve a greater meaning arranged together just so. As a man, he’s immediately identifiable: the Lee Marvin face, that shock of white hair that looks like Andy Warhol touched up with a Tesla coil.
As a director, too, there are recurring elements: a minimalist aesthetic, laconic but lovable characters (often played by musicians), a cool compositional remove that invites humour without sacrificing sincerity. These are films that believe everything is connected; theirs is a cinema of culture in conversation with itself. A young Japanese couple obsessed with Elvis. William Blake reborn into the American west. Instruments that resonate with every note that’s been played on them, the world bound together by cab rides and cups of coffee. “Each one of us is a set of shifting molecules, spinning in ecstasy,” says one character in The Limits of Control. “In the future, worn-out things will be made new again by reconfiguring their molecules.”
Only Lovers Left Alive is a film about the urgency of that recycling process, a snickering genre tale that shacks up with a pair of exhausted paramours desperate to become new yet frustrated that they can’t grow old. Jarmusch has been trying to make the movie for seven years… I’d happily argue Only Lovers Left Alive is Jarmusch’s best film, but it might be more helpful to say it’s his most fluent. The leads are Eve (Swinton) in Tangier, an ancient city forever on the cusp of rebirth, and Adam (Tom Hiddleston), in Detroit, contemporary America’s most famous icon of decay. …
They live apart because they can, because it doesn’t deprive them of time together. “If you live that long, separation for a year might feel like a weekend,” says Jarmusch, his voice a spacey drawl. “It’s not an obligation, it’s an emotional connection.” It’s one so strong that Adam, a natural romantic who sees poetry in science, intimates that his relationship with Eve is an example of Einstein’s theory of entanglement: “When you separate an entwined particle, and you move both parts away from the other, even on opposite ends of the universe if you alter or affect one, the other will be identically altered or affected.” …
It’s hard not to see the theatrically suicidal Adam as Jarmusch in disguise, the director’s neuroses in almost human form. For one thing, both of them love Swinton. “It’s everything about her,” says Jarmusch, eyes lost over my shoulder. “It’s her physicality, the way that she moves … like a vestigial predator, like a wolf.”
There’s certainly a feral element to Eve’s appearance; her character comes off as a Nobel laureate raised by wild animals. For Jarmusch, though, it’s her clear eyes that are most compelling. “She has an ability to prioritise what’s really important in life. Once I was listening to her, I think we were at lunch with Patti Smith, and I thought: ‘Oh boy, if all culture breaks down, I’m following them. They’re my leaders, the women are the way to go.’ One of the great moments in my life,” he continues, “was when we were shooting The Limits of Control, and we finished a take and I said: ‘Oh Tilda, that was so beautiful, will you marry me?” And she replied: ‘Oh darling, we already are.’ I could have died.”
Jim Jarmusch: ‘Women are my leaders’ | Guardian

kateoplis:

Speaking to Jim Jarmusch, it turns out, isn’t so different from watching one of his films. His work, like his conversation, doesn’t cohere into stories so much as constellations, networks of seemingly isolated ideas which achieve a greater meaning arranged together just so. As a man, he’s immediately identifiable: the Lee Marvin face, that shock of white hair that looks like Andy Warhol touched up with a Tesla coil.

As a director, too, there are recurring elements: a minimalist aesthetic, laconic but lovable characters (often played by musicians), a cool compositional remove that invites humour without sacrificing sincerity. These are films that believe everything is connected; theirs is a cinema of culture in conversation with itself. A young Japanese couple obsessed with Elvis. William Blake reborn into the American west. Instruments that resonate with every note that’s been played on them, the world bound together by cab rides and cups of coffee. “Each one of us is a set of shifting molecules, spinning in ecstasy,” says one character in The Limits of Control. “In the future, worn-out things will be made new again by reconfiguring their molecules.”

Only Lovers Left Alive is a film about the urgency of that recycling process, a snickering genre tale that shacks up with a pair of exhausted paramours desperate to become new yet frustrated that they can’t grow old. Jarmusch has been trying to make the movie for seven years… I’d happily argue Only Lovers Left Alive is Jarmusch’s best film, but it might be more helpful to say it’s his most fluent. The leads are Eve (Swinton) in Tangier, an ancient city forever on the cusp of rebirth, and Adam (Tom Hiddleston), in Detroit, contemporary America’s most famous icon of decay. …

They live apart because they can, because it doesn’t deprive them of time together. “If you live that long, separation for a year might feel like a weekend,” says Jarmusch, his voice a spacey drawl. “It’s not an obligation, it’s an emotional connection.” It’s one so strong that Adam, a natural romantic who sees poetry in science, intimates that his relationship with Eve is an example of Einstein’s theory of entanglement: “When you separate an entwined particle, and you move both parts away from the other, even on opposite ends of the universe if you alter or affect one, the other will be identically altered or affected.” …

It’s hard not to see the theatrically suicidal Adam as Jarmusch in disguise, the director’s neuroses in almost human form. For one thing, both of them love Swinton. “It’s everything about her,” says Jarmusch, eyes lost over my shoulder. “It’s her physicality, the way that she moves … like a vestigial predator, like a wolf.”

There’s certainly a feral element to Eve’s appearance; her character comes off as a Nobel laureate raised by wild animals. For Jarmusch, though, it’s her clear eyes that are most compelling. “She has an ability to prioritise what’s really important in life. Once I was listening to her, I think we were at lunch with Patti Smith, and I thought: ‘Oh boy, if all culture breaks down, I’m following them. They’re my leaders, the women are the way to go.’ One of the great moments in my life,” he continues, “was when we were shooting The Limits of Control, and we finished a take and I said: ‘Oh Tilda, that was so beautiful, will you marry me?” And she replied: ‘Oh darling, we already are.’ I could have died.”

Jim Jarmusch: ‘Women are my leaders’ | Guardian

centerforinvestigativereporting:

What happens when you pair poets with investigative reporters to tell the stories of local public housing residents?
Watch the new short film from Off Page Project, our collaboration with Youth Speaks, to find out.

centerforinvestigativereporting:

What happens when you pair poets with investigative reporters to tell the stories of local public housing residents?

Watch the new short film from Off Page Project, our collaboration with Youth Speaks, to find out.

(Source: crossettlibrary)

policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations
Follow policymic

policymic:

There’s 6,300 tonnes of space junk orbiting Earth — Astonishing interactive visualizations

Follow policymic

(via newsweek)

karenhurley:

RoAndCo   |   http://roandcostudio.com

"Honor is a high-end women’s luxury brand that translates the nostalgia of an old-world atelier into something sophisticated, wearable and modern. We designed the invitation for its FW13 presentation around the flashy hits of ’90s pop-color present in the collection, using fluorescent pink vinyl, a staple of that era to create the card, then foil-stamping the artwork in hot pink."

RoAndCo, founded in 2006, is a multi-disciplinary creative agency that serves as a visual thought leader, aiming to thoughtfully distill a client’s inspirations, ideas and motivations into fresh, sincere and compelling brand messages that engage and resonate.

It is the capitalist industries which are destroying the world, whether or not you or I turn off our lightbulbs at home.

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervine (via neuriot)

*nods*

(Source: lifeofabarbecue, via mohandasgandhi)

bookmark

(Source: jkjkjkjkjkjkjkjkjkjk, via karenhurley)

good:

The pages are starting to go up on the wall for the upcoming issue—the 32nd issue of GOOD! #goodmagazine #longliveprint #behindthescenes #sundayfunday

gotta go this way for the next issue.

good:

The pages are starting to go up on the wall for the upcoming issue—the 32nd issue of GOOD! #goodmagazine #longliveprint #behindthescenes #sundayfunday

gotta go this way for the next issue.

unconsumption:


Dismayed by the California Department of Transportation’s plans to scrap the steel from the recently replaced eastern span of the Bay Bridge, Bay Area resident David Grieshaber is looking to turn a section of it into a three-story home that would include a loft for himself and his wife, a rental space for Airbnb guests, and public space for visitors.

More: Someone Wants to Build a Home from Old Bay Bridge Scraps - Architectural Craziness - Curbed National

unconsumption:

Dismayed by the California Department of Transportation’s plans to scrap the steel from the recently replaced eastern span of the Bay Bridge, Bay Area resident David Grieshaber is looking to turn a section of it into a three-story home that would include a loft for himself and his wife, a rental space for Airbnb guests, and public space for visitors.

More: Someone Wants to Build a Home from Old Bay Bridge Scraps - Architectural Craziness - Curbed National